How/Why/What is DevOps?

Thanks to Grant for hosting this month’s T-SQL Tuesday found (http://www.scarydba.com/2017/06/06/t-sql-tuesday-091-databases-devops/) where it is a chance to share our DevOps stories. I am not going into specifics of databases but I am going to write about it more generally.

TSQLTues

Continue reading

Microsoft Data Platform is changing – so am I

This month’s T-SQL Tuesday entry hosted by Koen Verbeeck (http://sqlkover.com/t-sql-tuesday-89-invitation-the-times-they-are-a-changing/), a blog post about how we feel about the ever changing times within our technology space. Personally I love this new era of cloud computing and do not feel threatened in anyway.

TSQLTues

Continue reading

Extreme situations require extreme commands

The title is adapted from a child-hood movie of mine and is my daily (database-related) WTF moment and it is my entry for this month’s T-SQL Tuesday found: http://www.pontop.dk/single-post/2017/03/07/Announcing-T-SQL-Tuesday-88-%E2%80%93-The-daily-database-related-WTF

tsql

Continue reading

SQL Server Bugs & Enhancement Requests

T-SQL Tuesday #86: SQL Server Bugs & Enhancement Requests hosted by Brent Ozar.

https://www.brentozar.com/archive/2017/01/announcing-t-sql-tuesday-87-sql-server-bugs-enhancement-requests/

tsql

I did not want to miss out on this one because I want to mention a connect item that I logged last year which is still active.

This is an enhancement request for SQL Server where I got the idea from SQL database (Azure).

Wait Stats is my “go-to” thing, when you want to dig into performance issues everyone knows you will probably end up using sys.dm_os_wait_stats. You cannot use this in the Azure world, you have to use a DMV that is scoped to the database level. I think this would be a nice idea to have with the “earth” based SQL Servers – the ability to return information about all the waits encountered by threads that executed at the database level.

The connect item can be found at this link: https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/2647332/sys-dm-db-wait-stats-dmv?tduid=(262281c4c73a682498780643b77e80d1)(256380)(2459594)(TnL5HPStwNw-KjxCoz0pGWobbq7q1MQTIw)()

An example of using the DMV that I would like:

WITH Waits AS
(SELECT wait_type, wait_time_ms / 1000. AS wait_time_s,
100. * wait_time_ms / SUM(wait_time_ms) OVER() AS pct,
ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY wait_time_ms DESC) AS rn
FROM sys.dm_db_wait_stats
)
SELECT W1.wait_type,
CAST(W1.wait_time_s AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS wait_time_s,
CAST(W1.pct AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS pct,
CAST(SUM(W2.pct) AS DECIMAL(12, 2)) AS running_pct
FROM Waits AS W1
INNER JOIN Waits AS W2
ON W2.rn <= W1.rn
GROUP BY W1.rn, W1.wait_type, W1.wait_time_s, W1.pct
HAVING SUM(W2.pct) - W1.pct <  99

WAITSDMV.JPG

It currently has 8 votes, would be nice to get some more.

TDE Recovery

This week’s TSQL Tuesday is being held by the mighty Kenneth Fisher – Backup and Recovery- see this link, how can I not get involved with this one?

tsql

I have been blogging for about a year now and have covered most of Kenneth’s bullet points – except Internals and SSAS based stuff, so I decided to do something different but still about backups. This post is all about the importance of backing up certain objects when you are using TDE – Transparent Data Encryption.

To understand TDE see my older post  – https://blobeater.blog/2016/11/22/playing-with-tde/

So I have enabled TDE and I have a Full backup – lets restore it to a different server.

USE [master]
RESTORE DATABASE [DWHDB]
FROM  DISK = N'C:\temp\dwh.bak' WITH  FILE = 1, STATS = 5
GO

Cannot find server certificate with thumbprint ‘0xC0367AC8E9AE54538C17ACB0F63070D6FF21316A’.
Msg 3013, Level 16, State 1, Line 2
RESTORE DATABASE is terminating abnormally.

The dreaded cannot find server certificate with thumbprint message. Why is this happening?

Well if you read my post on TDE ( or anybody else’s) you would have noticed the following message:

Warning: The certificate used for encrypting the database encryption key has not been backed up. You should immediately back up the certificate and the private key associated with the certificate. If the certificate ever becomes unavailable or if you must restore or attach the database on another server, you must have backups of both the certificate and the private key or you will not be able to open the database.

So the point is – back them up

USE master
GO
BACKUP CERTIFICATE MyServerCert
TO FILE = 'c:\data\MyServerCert.cer'
WITH PRIVATE KEY
(FILE = 'c:\data\certificate_MyServerCert.pvk',
ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'xxxxxxxx')

Then on the restoring server you will need to issue the following (assuming you have a database master key too)


CREATE CERTIFICATE MyServerCert
FROM FILE = 'c:\temp\MyServerCert.cer'
WITH PRIVATE KEY (FILE = 'c:\temp\certificate_MyServerCert.pvk',
DECRYPTION BY PASSWORD = 'xxxxxxxx');

GO
USE [master]
RESTORE DATABASE [DWHDB]
FROM  DISK = N'C:\temp\dwh.bak' WITH  FILE = 1, STATS = 5

GO

RESTORE DATABASE successfully processed 13002 pages in 0.444 seconds (228.770 MB/sec) – the restore works a charm.